Archimedes Death Ray

300px-Archimedes_Heat_Ray_conceptual_diagram.svg“The 2nd century AD author Lucian wrote that during the Siege of Syracuse (c.214–212 BC), Archimedes destroyed enemy ships with fire. Centuries later,Anthemius of Tralles mentions burning-glasses as Archimedes’ weapon.[30] The device, sometimes called the “Archimedes heat ray”, was used to focus sunlight onto approaching ships, causing them to catch fire.” From Wikipedia

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The History of “Scientist”

The Renaissance Mathematicus

Today is a red-letter day for readers of The Renaissance Mathematicus; I have succeeded in cajoling, seducing, bullying, bribing, inducing, tempting, luring, sweet-talking, coaxing, coercing, enticing, beguiling[1] Harvard University’s very own Dr Melinda Baldwin into writing a guest post on the history of the term scientist, in particular its very rocky path to acceptance by the scientific community. First coined by William Whewell at the third annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 1833 in response to Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s strongly expressed objection to men of science using the term philosopher to describe themselves, the term experienced a very turbulent existence before its final grudging acceptance almost one hundred years later. In her excellent post Melinda outlines that turbulent path to acceptance, read and enjoy.

J.T. Carrington, editor of the popular science magazine Science-Gossip, achieved a remarkable feat in December of 1894: he found a…

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FAMOUS PHYSICISTS: GJ Stoney

GJ Stoney“George Johnstone Stoney (15 February 1826 – 5 July 1911) was anAnglo-Irish physicist. He is most famous for introducing the term electron as the “fundamental unit quantity of electricity”.[1] He had introduced the concept, though not the word, as early as 1874 and 1881, and the word came in 1891.[2]  [3] [4] He published around 75 scientific papers during his lifetime.” from Wikipedia

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FAMOUS PHYSICISTS: Robert Boyle

boyle_robert“Robert Boyle, FRS, (25 January 1627 – 31 December 1691) was an Irish 17th-century natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, and inventor. Born inLismore, County Waterford, Ireland, he was also noted for his writings in theology. Although his research clearly has its roots in the alchemicaltradition, Boyle is largely regarded today as the first modern chemist, and therefore one of the founders of modern chemistry, and one of the pioneers of modern experimental scientific method. He is best known for Boyle’s law,[2] which describes the inversely proportional relationship between the absolute pressure and volume of a gas, if the temperature is kept constant within a closed system.[3][4] Among his works, The Sceptical Chymist is seen as a cornerstone book in the field of chemistry.” from Wikipedia

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